Teachers, children, testers and leaders

This article appeared in the March 2013 edition of the Testing Planet magazine.Testing Planet magazine

"A tester is someone who knows things can be different" - Gerald Weinberg.

Leaders aren't necessarily people who do things, or order other people about. To me the important thing about leaders is that they enable other people to do better, whether by inspiration, by example or just by telling them how things can be different - and better. The difference between a leader and a manager is like the difference between a great teacher and, well, the driver of the school bus. Both take children places, but a teacher can take children on a journey that will transform their whole life.

My first year or so in working life after I left university was spent in a fog of confusion. I struggled to make sense of the way companies worked; I must be more stupid than I'd always thought. All these people were charging around, briskly getting stuff done, making money and keeping the world turning; they understood what they were doing and what was going on. They must be smarter than me.

Gradually it dawned on me that very many of them hadn't a clue. They were no wiser than me. They didn't really know what was going on either. They thought they did. They had their heads down, working hard, convinced they were contributing to company profits, or at least keeping the losses down.

The trouble was their efforts often didn't have much to do with the objectives of the organisation, or the true goals of the users and the project in the case of IT. Being busy was confused with being useful. Few people were capable of sitting back, looking at what was going on and seeing what was valuable as opposed to mere work creation.

I saw endless cases of poor work, sloppy service and misplaced focus. I became convinced that we were all working hard doing unnecessary, and even harmful, things for users who quite rightly were distinctly ungrateful. It wasn't a case of the end justifying the means; it was almost the reverse. The means were only loosely connected to the ends, and we were focussing obsessively on the means without realising that our efforts were doing little to help us achieve our ends.

Formal processes didn't provide a clear route to our goal. Following the process had become the goal itself. I'm not arguing against processes; just the attitude we often bring to them, confusing the process with the destination, the map with the territory. The quote from Gerald Weinberg absolutely nails the right attitude for testers to bring to their work. There are twin meanings. Testers should know there is a difference between what people expect, or assume, and what really is. They should also know that there is a difference between what is, and what could be.

Testers usually focus on the first sort of difference; seeing the product for what it really is and comparing that to what the users and developers expected. However, the second sort of difference should follow on naturally. What could the product be? What could we be doing better?

Testers have to tell a story, to communicate not just the reality to the stakeholders, but also a glimpse of what could be. Organisations need people who can bring clear headed thinking to confusion, standing up and pointing out that something is wrong, that people are charging around doing the wrong things, that things could be better. Good testers are well suited by instinct to seeing what positive changes are possible. Communicating these possibilities, dispelling the fog, shining a light on things that others would prefer to remain in darkness; these are all things that testers can and should do. And that too is a form of leadership, every bit as much as standing up in front of the troops and giving a rousing speech.

In Hans Christian's Andersen's story, the Emperor's New Clothes, who showed a glimpse of leadership? Not the emperor, not his courtiers; it was the young boy who called out the truth, that the Emperor was wearing no clothes at all. If testers are not prepared to tell it like it is, to explain why things are different from what others are pretending, to explain how they could be better then we diminish and demean our profession. Leaders do not have to be all-powerful figures. They can be anyone who makes a difference; teachers, children. Or even testers.